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WOLVERHAMPTON LITERATURE FESTIVAL

FRIDAY 26TH - SUNDAY 28TH JANUARY 2018

THE ASIAN WRITER SHORT STORY PRIZE 

DIVIDING LINES

SHORT STORIES ON THE THEME OF BORDERS, BOUNDARIES & BELONGING

FROM THE SHORT LIST OF THE ASIAN WRITER SHORT STORY PRIZE 2016

WOLVERHAMPTON ART GALLERY

Sunday 28th January - 3.30pm

60mins

FREE ENTRY

 

A wonderful collection of stories on the theme of borders, boundaries and belonging, shortlisted for The Asian Writer Short Story Prize 2016. This anthology of short stories, published in April 2017, introduces 13 exciting new voices and their writing. The stories cover a range of experiences, literary styles and subjects.

 

Mona Dash and Ashok Patel will be reading from their short stories from Dividing Lines. They will be answering questions from the Chair and from the audience. There will be an opportunity to buy copies of Dividing Lines and have author signing.

 

 

Mona Dash

 

With an education in Telecoms Engineering and Management from Odisha, India, Mona Dash works as a sales manager in a leading global technology organisation. She writes fiction and poetry and her work has been anthologised widely and published in international journals. She has a Masters in Creative Writing (with distinction) from the London Metropolitan University.

She has  two collections of poetry ‘Dawn- Drops’ (Writer’s Workshop, 2001) ‘A certain way’ (Skylark Publications, UK 2016). ‘Untamed Heart’ (Tara India Research Press, 2016) is her first novel. Mona has also participated in readings in venues such as Lauderdale House, Nehru Centre, the House of Lords, The Library, Leicester Writes festival, Yurt Café, London. Her short stories have been shortlisted and longlisted in various competitions such as The Asian Writer, Fish Short story, Strand International, Words and Women, UK, to name some. She was awarded a 'Poet of Excellence' award from the Word Masala Foundation in a ceremony at the House of Lords.

 

About the story : The boatboy is fictionalised but based on the life of BajI Raut, one of the youngest martyrs in India. Very little is known about him outside his home state of Odisha, which is the reason Mona wanted to voice this young boy's life and fight. His story is also about identity  and a sense of belonging, in a world divided between young revolutionaries, the British and the king of the Princely state in Odisha.

 

 

Ashok Patel

 

Ashok was brought up in Leicester and has lived in Birmingham for the last seventeen years. He is a Lecturer in Biomedical Sciences. His interest in creative writing began as a way to express his British Indian identity and experiences.  He is interested in the complexity of the ways that people and cultures interact with each other.

 

He has written an afternoon play for BBC R4, which was directed by Vanessa Whitburn. He has had a short play, in the trilogy of 3 short plays under the title the Cornershop, which was produced by Man Mela Theatre Company and toured nationally.

 

His short story, Ninety Days, is about an Asian family escaping from Uganda in 1972. President Idi Amin had declared that all Asians leave Uganda, and as his ninety day deadline approaches Asians all over Uganda are in panic. A family leave everything behind and endure the hostility of the army, as they try to make their way to Entebbe Airport.

 

 

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